Arizona Health Sciences

Enkephalin analogues with N-phenyl-N-(piperidin-2-ylmethyl)propionamide derivatives: Synthesis and biological evaluations.

TitleEnkephalin analogues with N-phenyl-N-(piperidin-2-ylmethyl)propionamide derivatives: Synthesis and biological evaluations.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsDeekonda S, Cole J, Sunna S, Rankin D, Largent-Milnes TM, Davis P, BassiriRad NM, Lai J, Vanderah TW, Porecca F, Hruby VJ
JournalBioorg Med Chem Lett
Volume26
Issue1
Pagination222-7
Date Published2016 Jan 01
ISSN1464-3405
KeywordsAmides, Analgesics, Animals, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Enkephalins, Guinea Pigs, Humans, Ileum, Ligands, Mice, Molecular Structure, Pain, Piperidines, Rats, Receptors, Opioid, delta, Receptors, Opioid, mu, Structure-Activity Relationship
Abstract

N-Phenyl-N-(piperidin-2-ylmethyl)propionamide based bivalent ligands are unexplored for the design of opioid based ligands. Two series of hybrid molecules bearing N-phenyl-N-(piperidin-2-ylmethyl)propionamide derived small molecules conjugated with an enkephalin analogues with and without a linker (β-alanine) were designed and synthesized. Both bivalent ligand series exhibited remarkable binding affinities from nanomolar to subnanomolar range at both μ and δ opioid receptors and displayed potent agonist activities as well. The replacement of Tyr with Dmt and introduction of a linker between the small molecule and enkephalin analogue resulted in highly potent ligands. Both series of ligands showed excellent binding affinities at both μ (0.6-0.9nM) and δ (0.2-1.2nM) opioid receptors respectively. Similarly, these bivalent ligands exhibited potent agonist activities in both MVD and GPI assays. Ligand 17 was evaluated for in vivo antinociceptive activity in non-injured rats following spinal administration. Ligand 17 was not significantly effective in alleviating acute pain. The most likely explanations for this low intrinsic efficacy in vivo despite high in vitro binding affinity, moderate in vitro activity are (i) low potency suggesting that higher doses are needed; (ii) differences in experimental design (i.e. non-neuronal, high receptor density for in vitro preparations versus CNS site of action in vitro); (iii) pharmacodynamics (i.e. engaging signalling pathways); (iv) pharmacokinetics (i.e. metabolic stability). In summary, our data suggest that further optimisation of this compound 17 is required to enhance intrinsic antinociceptive efficacy.

DOI10.1016/j.bmcl.2015.10.081
Alternate JournalBioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PubMed ID26611918
PubMed Central IDPMC4873255
Grant ListP01 DA006284 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
R01 CA097360 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DA013449 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
2P01 DA006284 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
Faculty Member Reference: 
Victor Hruby, Ph.D.
Tally Largent-Milnes, Ph.D.
Frank Porreca, Ph.D.
Todd Vanderah, Ph.D.