Arizona Health Sciences

(S)-Lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

Title(S)-Lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMoutal A, Chew LA, Yang X, Wang Y, Yeon SKi, Telemi E, Meroueh S, Park KDuk, Shrinivasan R, Gilbraith KB, Qu C, Xie JY, Patwardhan A, Vanderah TW, Khanna M, Porreca F, Khanna R
JournalPain
Date Published2016 Mar 9
ISSN1872-6623
Abstract

Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions that regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block: peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-Lacosamide (LCM), the inactive enantiomer of the FDA-approved anti-epileptic drug (R)-Lacosamide ((R)-LCM, Vimpat). We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-LCM inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high-content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-LCM decreased the DRG neurons responding to mustard oil and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of post-operative pain and two models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain that works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations.

DOI10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000555
Alternate JournalPain
PubMed ID26967696
Faculty Member Reference: 
Rajesh Khanna
May Khanna, Ph.D.
Amol Patwardhan, M.D., Ph.D.
Frank Porreca, PhD
Todd Vanderah, PhD
Yanhua Xie, Ph.D.