Cholesterol modifies classical conditioning of the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) nictitating membrane response.

TitleCholesterol modifies classical conditioning of the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) nictitating membrane response.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsSchreurs BG, Smith-Bell CA, Lochhead J, D Sparks L
JournalBehav Neurosci
Volume117
Issue6
Pagination1220-32
Date Published2003 Dec
ISSN0735-7044
KeywordsAmyloid beta-Peptides, Animals, Association Learning, Cerebral Cortex, Cholesterol, Conditioning, Classical, Conditioning, Eyelid, Hippocampus, Male, Nictitating Membrane, Rabbits
Abstract

Cholesterol plays an important role in synapse formation, receptor function, and synaptic plasticity, and animal studies show that modifying cholesterol may improve learning and memory. Other data show that feeding animals cholesterol can induce beta amyloid accumulation. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) fed 2% cholesterol for 8 weeks were given trace conditioning of the nictitating membrane response using a 100-ms tone, a 700-ms trace, and periorbital electrical stimulation or airpuff. Rabbits fed cholesterol showed significant facilitation of trace conditioning to airpuff and conditioning-specific reflex modification to periorbital electrical stimulation and airpuff. The cholesterol-fed rabbits had beta amyloid accumulation in the cortex, but little in the hippocampus. The data suggest cholesterol had facilitative effects that outweighed potential amnesic effects of cortical beta amyloid.

DOI10.1037/0735-7044.117.6.1220
Alternate JournalBehav. Neurosci.
PubMed ID14674842
Grant ListMH64715 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
Faculty Member Reference: 
Jeffrey J. Lochhead, PhD