A select combination of clinically relevant phytoestrogens enhances estrogen receptor beta-binding selectivity and neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo.

TitleA select combination of clinically relevant phytoestrogens enhances estrogen receptor beta-binding selectivity and neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsZhao L, Mao Z, Brinton RDiaz
JournalEndocrinology
Volume150
Issue2
Pagination770-83
Date Published2009 Feb
ISSN1945-7170
KeywordsAnimals, Brain, Cells, Cultured, Cytoprotection, Drug Combinations, Energy Metabolism, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Estrogen Receptor beta, Female, Models, Biological, Neurons, Neuroprotective Agents, Ovariectomy, Phytoestrogens, Pregnancy, Protein Binding, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Substrate Specificity, Up-Regulation
Abstract

We have previously shown that a number of naturally occurring phytoestrogens and derivatives were effective to induce some measures of neuroprotective responses but at a much lower magnitude than those induced by the female gonadal estrogen 17beta-estradiol. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether a combination of select phytoestrogens could enhance neural responses without affecting the reproductive system. We performed a range of comparative analyses of the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha/beta binding profile, and in vitro to in vivo estrogenic activities in neural and uterine tissues induced by clinically relevant phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, equol, and IBSO03569, when used alone or in combination. Our analyses revealed that both the ERalpha/beta binding profile and neural activities associated with individual phytoestrogens are modifiable when used in combination. Specifically, the combination of genistein plus daidzein plus equol resulted in the greatest binding selectivity for ERbeta and an overall improved efficacy/safety profile when compared with single or other combined formulations, including: 1) an approximate 30% increase in ERbeta-binding selectivity (83-fold over ERalpha); 2) a greater effect on neuronal survival against toxic insults in primary neurons; 3) an enhanced activity in promoting neural proactive defense mechanisms against neurodegeneration, including mitochondrial function and beta-amyloid degradation; and 4) no effect on uterine growth. These observations suggest that select phytoestrogens in combination have the therapeutic potential of an alternative approach to conventional estrogen therapy for long-term safe use to reduce the increased risk of cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disease associated with menopause in women.

DOI10.1210/en.2008-0715
Alternate JournalEndocrinology
PubMed ID18818291
Faculty Member Reference: 
Roberta Diaz Brinton, Ph.D